All information received from the Occupational Outlook Handbook 2019 https://www.bls.gov/ooh/

 

#1 SOLAR INSTALLERS

African American Solar Careers

 What Solar Photovoltaic Installers Do

Solar photovoltaic (PV) installers, also known as PV installers, assemble, install, and maintain solar panel systems on rooftops or other structures.

Work Environment

Most solar panel installations are done outdoors, but PV installers sometimes work in attics and crawl spaces to connect panels to the electric grid. Installers must also travel to jobsites.

How to Become a Solar Photovoltaic Installer

Although most installers need a high school diploma and typically receive on-the-job training lasting up to 1 year, some candidates take courses at a technical school or community college.

Quick Facts: Solar Photovoltaic Installers
2018 Median Pay $42,680 per year
$20.52 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training Moderate-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2016 11,300
Job Outlook, 2016-26 105% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 11,800 

 

#2 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS

What Physician Assistants Do

Physician assistants, also known as PAs, practice medicine on teams with physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare workers. They examine, diagnose, and treat patients.

Work Environment

Physician assistants work in physicians’ offices, hospitals, outpatient clinics, and other healthcare settings. Most work full time.

How to Become a Physician Assistant

Physician assistants typically need a master’s degree from an accredited educational program. All states require physician assistants to be licensed.

Quick Facts: Physician Assistants
2018 Median Pay $108,610 per year
$52.22 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Master’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 106,200
Job Outlook, 2016-26 37% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 39,600

 

#3 SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

What Software Developers Do

Software developers are the creative minds behind computer programs. Some develop the applications that allow people to do specific tasks on a computer or another device. Others develop the underlying systems that run the devices or that control networks.

Work Environment

Many software developers work for firms that deal in computer systems design and related services, manufacturing, or for software publishers.

How to Become a Software Developer

Software developers usually have a bachelor’s degree in computer science and strong computer programming skills.

Quick Facts: Software Developers
2018 Median Pay $105,590 per year
$50.77 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 1,256,200
Job Outlook, 2016-26 24% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 302,500

 

#4 NURSE PRACTITIONERS

Black and Brown NURSE PRACTITIONERS

What Nurse Practitioners Do

Nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of practice varies from state to state.

Work Environment

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners work in a wide variety of healthcare settings, including hospitals, physicians’ offices, and clinics. Most APRNs work full time.

How to Become a Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Midwife, or Nurse Practitioner

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners must earn at least a master’s degree in one of the APRN roles. They must also be licensed in their state and pass a national certification exam.

Quick Facts: Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners
2018 Median Pay $113,930 per year
$54.78 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Master’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 203,800
Job Outlook, 2016-26 31% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 64,200

 

#5 INFORMATION SECURITY ANALYSTS

 

What Information Security Analysts Do

Information security analysts plan and carry out security measures to protect an organization’s computer networks and systems. Their responsibilities are continually expanding as the number of cyberattacks increases.

Work Environment

Most information security analysts work for computer companies, consulting firms, or business and financial companies.

How to Become an Information Security Analyst

Most information security analyst positions require a bachelor’s degree in a computer-related field. Employers usually prefer to hire analysts with experience in a related occupation.

Quick Facts: Information Security Analysts
2018 Median Pay $98,350 per year
$47.28 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 100,000
Job Outlook, 2016-26 28% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 28,500

 

#6 MATHEMATICIANS & STATISTICIANS

What Mathematicians and Statisticians Do

Mathematicians and statisticians analyze data and apply mathematical and statistical techniques to help solve real-world problems in business, engineering, healthcare, or other fields.

Work Environment

Many mathematicians and statisticians work in the federal government and in private science and engineering research companies. They may work on teams with engineers, scientists, and other professionals.

How to Become a Mathematician or Statistician

Mathematicians and statisticians typically need at least a master’s degree in mathematics or statistics. However, some positions are available to those with a bachelor’s degree.

Quick Facts: Mathematicians and Statisticians
2018 Median Pay $88,190 per year
$42.40 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Master’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 40,300
Job Outlook, 2016-26 33% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 13,500

 

#7 WIND TURBINE TECHNICIANS

What Wind Turbine Technicians Do

Wind turbine service technicians, also known as windtechs, install, maintain, and repair wind turbines.

Work Environment

Wind turbine service technicians generally work outdoors, in confined spaces, and often at great heights. Although the majority of windtechs work full time, they may also be on call to handle emergencies during evenings and weekends.

How to Become a Wind Turbine Technician

Most wind turbine service technicians learn their trade by attending a technical school. They also receive on-the-job training.

Quick Facts: Wind Turbine Technicians
2018 Median Pay $54,370 per year
$26.14 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Postsecondary nondegree award
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training Long-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2016 5,800
Job Outlook, 2016-26 96% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 5,600

 

#8 GENETIC COUNSELORS

What Genetic Counselors Do

Genetic counselors assess individual or family risk for a variety of inherited conditions, such as genetic disorders and birth defects. They provide information and support to other healthcare providers, or to individuals and families concerned with the risk of inherited conditions.

Work Environment

Genetic counselors work in university medical centers, private and public hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, and physicians’ offices. They work with families, patients, and other medical professionals. Most genetic counselors work full time.

How to Become a Genetic Counselor

Genetic counselors typically need a master’s degree in genetic counseling or genetics, and board certification.

Quick Facts: Genetic Counselors
2018 Median Pay $80,370 per year
$38.64 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Master’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 3,100
Job Outlook, 2016-26 29% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26

 

#9 PHYSICAL THERAPIST

What Physical Therapists Do

Physical therapists, sometimes called PTs, help injured or ill people improve their movement and manage their pain. These therapists are often an important part of the rehabilitation, treatment, and prevention of patients with chronic conditions, illnesses, or injuries.

Work Environment

Physical therapists typically work in private offices and clinics, hospitals, patients’ homes, and nursing homes. They spend much of their time on their feet, actively working with patients.

How to Become a Physical Therapist

Physical therapists entering the profession need a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. All states require physical therapists to be licensed.

Quick Facts: Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides
2018 Median Pay $48,090 per year
$23.12 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education See How to Become One
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training See How to Become One
Number of Jobs, 2016 140,300
Job Outlook, 2016-26 30% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 42,700

 

#10 MASSAGE THERAPISTS

 What Massage Therapists Do

Massage therapists treat clients by using touch to manipulate the muscles and other soft tissues of the body. With their touch, therapists relieve pain, help heal injuries, improve circulation, relieve stress, increase relaxation, and aid in the general wellness of clients.

Work Environment

Massage therapists work in an array of settings, such as spas, franchised clinics, physicians’ offices, hotels, and fitness centers. Some massage therapists also travel to clients’ homes or offices to give a massage.

How to Become a Massage Therapist

Massage therapists typically complete a postsecondary education program of 500 or more hours of study and experience, although standards and requirements vary by state or other jurisdictions. Most states regulate massage therapy and require massage therapists to have a license or certification.

Quick Facts: Massage Therapists
2018 Median Pay $41,420 per year
$19.92 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Postsecondary nondegree award
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 160,300
Job Outlook, 2016-26 26% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 42,100

 

 

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